Who was Sir John Warcup Cornforth? The chemist who overcame deafness to win the Nobel Prize

1 month ago

Sir John Warcup Cornforth was a Nobel Prize-winning chemist who was born a century ago (7 September 1917).

Sir John was known for his work in the field of stereochemistry, the study of how the spatial arrangement of atoms affects the properties of a chemical compound. He went on to study at the University of Oxford and work as a professor at the universities of Warwick, Suffolk and California in Los Angeles.

In celebration of what would have been his 100th birthday, Sir John has been honoured with a Google Doodle.

For more information, see here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/0/sir-john-warcup-cornforth-chemist-overcame-deafness-win-nobel/

Welcome to new students!

2 months ago

Congratulations to everyone who has been offered a place to study at Warwick Chemistry in October 2017! Please see the Welcome to Warwick page for our essential checklist and information about what to do before you arrive. We’ll also be sending out Welcome Packs to all new starters, with an introduction from our award-winning ChemSoc and a summary of what to expect in your first few weeks at Warwick, so keep an eye out for yours.

We look forward to welcoming you all to Warwick in October. In the meantime, if you have any queries, please feel free to contact our UG Administrator, Lucy Johnson.

Best wishes

Ann Dixon, Senior Admissions Tutor

Department of Chemistry

Scott, Fox and Gibson develop 'metallohelical antifreezes'

2 months 1 week ago

A collaboration between the Fox, Scott and Gibson groups has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The team were inspired by how small helical antifreeze proteins in Nature enable extreomophiles to survive low temperatures, where other species would not survive. Rather than using traditional peptide/protein chemistry, the team used self-assembled metallohelicates which have similar dimensions to a small alpha helix, and found some which were remarkably potent at stopping ice crystal growth ; a major technological challenge in applications from wind farms, to aircraft to cryopreservation. Modelling studies showed that the underlying activity could be linked the patches of hydrophobicity (water liking) and hydrophobicity (water hating).

Read the paper here

Antifreeze Protein Mimetic Metallohelices with Potent Ice Recrystallization Inhibition Activity

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1 hour 29 minutes ago
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